About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
FOXNEWS 32
FBC 18
MSNBCW 12
CNNW 11
MSNBC 11
CNN 10
CSPAN 9
CNBC 7
CSPAN2 7
KQEH (PBS) 7
WRC 7
KGO (ABC) 6
KNTV (NBC) 6
KPIX (CBS) 5
WBAL (NBC) 5
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 217
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 217 (some duplicates have been removed)
, 40 of them in new york city. and while an army of federal, state, and local workers, and many volunteers, have joined the massive relief and recovery effort, 2-1/2 million remain without power, four days after losing it monday evening. tens of thousands are displaced. their homes broken or destroyed. 5500 remain in new york city shelters. gaslines stretch for hours and tempers flair. and as life returns to normal for many millions, from north carolina to maine, with folks living in the most severely area, on the new jersey shore, or the new york city burrows of brooklyn, queens and stat ten island, it's doubtful the scars will ever fully heal. the shocking loss of life in and around the nation's largest and commercially most important city. the epic extent and depth of the damage. and the struggle to find essentials like food, water, power, shelter, continue to preoccupy and stress out millions who thought that katrina could never happen here. but it has happened. and as they pump the tunnels and open the subways, iconic landmarks are twisted and broken, and still we find bodi
,000 still stranded in this new jersey town. >>> crisis in new york. nearly half the city without power. at least two dozen dead, as the biggest hospitals fight to stay up and running. forced to evacuate the sickest patients down dark flights of stairs. >>> and, the aftermath. our team travels to the outer edges of the storm's fury, to towns demolished by a giant wall of water, where people were rescued from rooftops and sandy's misery stretches on. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with bill weir and cynthia mcfadden in new york city, and terry moran in tom's river, new jersey, this is a special edition of "nightline," the perfect storm. october 31st, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran and i'm in tom's river, new jersey, one of the hard-hit communities on the water in this state. the water that superstorm andy hurled against the atlantic seaboard from maryland, all the way up to new york city and beyond. so many communities utterly devastated. you can see this kind of scene, as you see behind me, mile after mile on this coast. and two days after landfall now, the
. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic city's casinos are back in business. what are the odds of that? but for many more, the misery inflicted by the monster storm feels like it is becoming permanent, homes destroyed, neighborhoods gone, a lifetime's investment wiped out. >> it is like you had a cute little home and now you have no place to stay. i mean, you don't have a home to live in. >> reporter: across new york, new jersey, and connecticut, recovery comes in many forms. for some, it is a full tank of gas. for others, it's when the lights go back on. and for one man in new jersey, it's seeing the utility truck arrive on his street. >> i looked outside and was -- felt like christmas. somebody delivering new telephone poles. this is the most happy feeling
unbelievablably the new york city mara thon goes on sunday. most important picture on the cover of the new york post the gen rators are putting electricity to tents in central park instead of the entire area of staten island or long island. that area has no power or home or shelter, nothing. >> steve: it is here in new york city and streets of midtown are fill would of people who are here for the mara thon that is here this weekend. and politicians said why didn't they cancel it. we understand millions of dollars come in the city. but still, we have people in the water in new york city. it is the worst storm to ever hit new york city, eric, why is it going on? if rudy guiliani was the mayor of new york city. those generators would not be parked outside of a tent in central park they would be in staten island. >> eric: number one the morgs on staten island. they are using make shift morgs-- morgues. and mark them in the gas stations where the lines are long. only a few have power . number three getting power to people. like those people . we have no clothes. we can't get back in our homes. new y
hoboken clearly from the west side of new york city. and as of last night, the mayor told us, there were as many as 20,000 people, of the population 50,000 people in the city, there were as many as 20,000 people still stranded in deep, impassable, and increasingly polluted floodwaters. the national guard did get to some of those people, starting late last night and into today. we'll have more about that very dramatic situation in just a moment. the national guard also arrived this morning in moonachie, new jersey, where the storm surge swamped the town very, very quickly. people in all sorts of housing in moonachie were caught unaware and trapped, but particularly folks in mobile homes had a very difficult time there. members of the national guard also rushed to the assistance today of new york city' bellevue hospital, which has been running on generators ever since the lower half of manhattan lost power monday night, when sandy came ashore. 17 million gallons of water flooded bellevue hospital's basement. after that shot we showed you last night of hospital employees making a human chai
colonel and fox military analyst, and former cia operative mike baker in new york city. thanks for being with us this evening. the first thing i want to talk about, now that we know there was this cabling on august august 16th, basically saying al qaeda is in the region, we're squared we need more security. we now no the white house situation room was watching real time as this unfolded. i want to look at who was in the white house situation, who would have been able to see what was going on in benghazi. >> you have department of state security office on the phone, to the department of state operations there. that goes directly to the situation room. he had a drone up. ran out of gas. another drone up. you had cia operations guys in benghazi talking, and then guys -- >> so we have audio, visual, and calls at that point in real-time and satellite and the drones, so who is watching. >> this is unfolding before their eyes and as the colonel said, as soon as this balloon goes up, you've got langly, for the cia, state department, the white house situation room. they're all screaming for infor
amtrak will begin offering limited service between new york city and boston. and new jersey transit will also start moving today with limited service. the new york subway system continues to make advances. the "m" train linking queens to manhattan just started running, but there are still no trains running below 34th street where half of manhattan remains in the dark. so the millions of new yorkers who depend on subways, they're now waiting in those long lines for buses. for those who drive into new york city, the lines at city bridges stretched for miles yesterday, enough to make you turn around and just stay home. it's simply not worth it. it will take all day to get in in some cases. in an effort to ease gridlock inside the city, the mayor has ordered all vehicles entering manhattan to have at least three passengers for the rest of the week. there are checkpoints set up on the way into manhattan with cars not meeting the three-person rule, those cars turned away. and you're only beginning to make your way into new york if you're lucky enough to find gas for your cars. about 80% o
. now lying in piles of rubble that stretch for miles across the new york city borough of staten island. cleanup is underway. and with every new layer of debris that's removed, the tragic stories emerge of the residents whose lives have been turned upside down. cnn's brian todd is on the scene for us. brian, what are you seeing on staten island right now? >> reporter: well, wolf, at just about every house you go to in the section of staten island you hear horrific and pretty detailed stories of just how bad the storm was. here's the story of one man who took a few hits. if you can't imagine what it's like to suffer through a massive storm, listen to nick. >> the water was so high. it was up to this part of the door. i couldn't get into the door. i went around the side of the house. and i stood on a box that was floating. and i went through the window to get back in the house with my family. >> reporter: taking us through his house on staten island, the retired ups truck driver says he and his family scrambledto n upper floor away from water he was sure was going to keep rising. his wife
it this way, in new york city, people can't find gasoline, and some went to find food from dumpsters from the stores, because they have no power or water, and what they have is still good, although it needed to be thrown out. and since you're going to hear the memory of katrina invoked more and more in the coming days, like days. like katrina, three days like katrina, three days out, we're still learning about places receiving very little help and attention, like staten island, ann curry has more. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, that is right, the outrage boiled over here in staten island, because more than three days after the hurricane here, people from the close-knit community, accused them of responding much slower here than to the richer parts of the city. >> every single person on this block lost everything. >> reporter: staten island has had enough. >> we just want everyone to know that we are hurting down here and we need help, immediately. >> reporter: residents here are asking why hasn't more help arrived? >> i think we're not getting more attention, because we are a wo
that fills up during major storms. >>> more on the situation here in new york city. some signs of recovery, if ever so slight. >> uh-huh. >> of street lights in lower manhattan which was inundated with wa water were restored yesterday. >> those living near the world trade center site, were first to have theirs turned back on. >> it was impossible to miss here in my hometown. lots of new yorkers walking instead of using limited bus service available. things will ease a bit today. parts of the city's extensive subway cyst,000 tell are reopening today. and measures are being put in place to ease gridlock on the streets. >> some folks had extremely long commutes because of the gridlock, yeah. resourcefulne resourcefulness, new york style. these folks hit a bank and used its power to charge cell phones. customers across northeast are having trouble completing calls because of knocked out transmission sites. late yesterday, at & t, team mobile, announced plans to share their networks during the aftermath. nice move, companies! >> new yorkers. >> been together. can you hear me now? >> resill yenl
. >> new york cannot be understood aside from this geography. indeed, no city could. be new york more so that almost any city in the river. because here you have what's really a natural location for a great city. it's probably one of the three greatest harbors in the world. and what's key is that at the very heart of new york is an island, manhattan. so that the indians, who were not in most places in the united states, in the early 17th century, were on the island of manhattan. because it was a natural location for a great city. >> that's a clip from the beginning of the definitive documentary about new york city, rick burns' "new york," a documentary film. as a natural location for a city, new york was sociologically and politically shaped by countless waves of new immigrants. but fundamentally, new york has always been a city shaped by water. the long, skinny island of brooklynn and queens to its east, staten island five miles south of long island. and the bronx, the only part of new york city on the american mainland, itself surrounded by water on three sides. if this week's megastor
from the metropolitan transit authority. that's the agency in charge of mass transit in new york city. look at the destruction there. that is the brooklyn battery tunnel flooded almost to the ceiling there. there's one of the subway stations close by. >>> mayor bloomberg, governor cuomo are touring the damage today and we will be following along with them. >>> now, even if your house an car are okay, what can you do? gasoline supplies are running low for cars and generators. coming up, we're going to map out the system to show you where the real bottleneck, the problems are. >>> and, advice from new orleans to new york. they've been through this before in the port of new orleans. what are the lessons they learned and how can it help here in the new york metropolitan area? >>> sue herera is off today. simon is in and at nyse. >> this is a good rally that we've got on the back of the economic data that came through today in advance, importantly, of tomorrow's employment report. you see this we are off our highs but it is still triple digit. volume is good. the volume yesterday actually
of new york city, there are hundreds and hundreds of cars lined up and they ran out of fuel. then picture came here to route 3, westbound, and an amazing sight, people lined up with gas cans for fuels or work vehicles, and people who have lined up their cars on route 3, waiting for hours. the people at the pumps now said they waited about two hours. we are told that this line stretches more than three miles. can you not see the end of it because it goes beyond the crest of the hill so the people at the end of that line could be in for a wait of several hours. the issue here is power. many of the gas stations, by one estimate, four out five gas stations in new jersey do not have power. they cannot pump the fuel. a couple have generators. if they do not have power they cannot pump. those that do are running out. or they have ridiculously long lines. the power could be out in new jersey for at least another week. >>shepard: i understand a town in jersey is talking about rationing. >>guest: one town has decided to go to an odd and even plan from the 70's, in your license lates ends with an od
are going out of their mind, out of patience, not only for the tough situation but form new york city detective bo dietl says a difficult situation if authorities do not help those whose temperatures are about for burst. you look to be in a separate world? >>guest: they are patting each other on the back. i have people on staten i'll, new jersey, on long island, my son if law's house, washed away. people living with no houses and people in staten island, crying with no water. be real. these people need help. we should mobilize our police department. get them over to staten island. there are only cops and firemen, maybe that is the problem. my problem is i am getting the calls each day, people are crying, why isn't anyone doing anything in now we don't care about that, we are going to have a marathon on sunday? something is wrong with somebody. this is ridiculous. guys who are retired say they call the special number and they are as the parade route on sunday for crowd control. they want to help people. you ought to find more bodies in the houses, with freeport and the rockaways. peopl
insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global predicts that if the areas affected by sandy lose a quarter of their output for just two days, it would knock about $25 billion off u.s. economic growth in the fourth quarter. that could be as much a 0.6%. but longer-term, some of the financial losses should be recovered by repair and rebuilding efforts. home improvement stores like home depot and lowes will likely get a boost in sales. many construction jobs will be created to rebuild homes and businesses. and governments will be spending huge amounts of money to repair subways, roads, and bridges so all of those efforts should help boost econoc activity early next year. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for a closer look at sandy's economic impact, mark zandi, chief economist at moody's analytics. you know, mark, people often hear that when there's a sdater like zandi, that it's actually a boost to the economy. is that going to be tr
is did the new york city rat survive hurricane sandy? >> please. >> all the flooding. >> they would survive a nuclear war. >> that's the thing. everyone thinks, an urban legend, there are just as many rats under, under new york, an old city built on top of, all of the sort of, the different layers of new york. they think there is one rat for every person. which would make 8 million rats. don't think there are 8 million rats. >> disgusting. >> i remember growing up, taking the 14th street, l train. they're not afraid of you. walk up to you. look at you. run along the third rail which is, supposed to electrocute them, does nothing to them. >> everywhere in the subway. what did the story say? did they survive this? >> some didn't. majority did. >> good thing maybe some of the babies washed out. took out a younger generation. some of the ones that were n nesting, got drowned. they'll make it no matter what. this weekend. most people half a chance to relax, cope with what is happening. may want to look for a new cocktail, something, different, new. jack daniels has a thing for you. a whi
unfolding as new images come in by the minute. while new york city is beginning to come back to life in some places there are striking new video from staten island where 19 people were killed by the super storm. officials there are asking for immediate help. millions are still without power, running water and food is running thin. some 80% of gas stations in new jersey alone are not working and tempers are flaring over hours' long lines. >> two years, and i lost it. >> i don't have anything, anywhere to go. i don't have no clothes. >> this video from staten island,be moments ago, people begging for food, water, clothing. >> $15 in my pocket. nowhere to go, know electricity, no food. >> supplies and patience are running out very quickly right now in new york and new jersey. >> i can't get no gas. everywhere i went, no gas. >> i counted more than 100 vehiclevehicles in this line. this is actually better than it was last night. >> i have been here for three hours. three hours. >> unbelievable. >> three hours. >> $10 for gas. no breakfast. we want to help, the government says we want to help. >>
. welcome, everybody. our "starting point" this morning, the aftermath of the superstorm. new york city slowly getting back to normal this morning, but no heat, no power, gas running low. bumper to bumper traffic. patience is being tested. some subways are running again this morning, so many are buses. fares, free, today, as workers are trying to keep the financial heart of the country beating. rob marciano this morning at the brooklyn bridge for us. hey, rob, good morning! >> reporter: good morning, soledad. there'll be a lot of foot traffic once again over this bridge. and if you are in a car, you'll need at least three people in that vehicle. carpooling is going to be the call today, because yesterday, there was absolute gridlock across the city. we didn't have much in the way of bus lines running. these subways were still shut down. all the people that would typically travel underground were trying to get to work aboveground. and boy, some places, there was chaos. i mean, people pushing and shoving, just to try to get on a bus. many buses that were traveling past 10th and 14th stree
.t.a. here in new york city. >> oh, sure, okay. [cheers and applause] >> yeah. >> that's a busy job. >> yes. >> a lot to do? >> see a lot of these running around. >> yeah, i know. the rats? [laughter] >> oh. >> but those aren't made of rubber, so... >> oh, no, no, no. >> yeah, yeah, yeah. >> that one's looking kind of hungry. [laughter] >> well, let me tell you. we're gonna give you a fun halloween-themed question. you get it right and you get $1,000. >> okay, all right, all right. thank you. thank you. >> there's only one caveat to all of this. in order to play for $1,000, you have to also wear the wig that jason had on. >> is that the wig he just took off? >> what? >> is that-- >> that's the wig he just took off. it's fine. >> that's worth $100,000. >> [laughs] [audience whistling, cheering] [cheers and applause] got it? >> yes. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. now we're talking. >> i'm ready. >> okay, alan says he's ready. you guys, are you ready? [cheers and applause] then let's play millionaire. [dramatic musical flourish] all right, alan, or whoever you are. i'm so confused. a new race called "
>>> good morning. gridlock. three days after sandy getting in and out of new york city a nightmare. long lines at gas stations across the region as the death toll from the storm rises to at least 74 people. >>> and new images show its fury in connecticut and new jersey today,thursday, november 1st, 2012. >>> and good morning. welcome to "today" on this thursday morning. i'm savannah gurthrie. >> and i'm matt lauer. the storm recovery is already beginning, but already mounting frustration among people over how long it's going to take. and i guess that's understandable. >> yeah, and it's going to take a while. that much is clear. not just here in the city, but across the northeast region. as we mentioned, gas has become a hot commodity, especially in storm-damaged parts of new jersey and long island. the traffic problems around new york city are so bad now, governor andrew cuomo has declared a transportation emergency. >>> couple of new regulations in place, for example, a minimum passenger mandate is in effect for cars that try to get on the island of manhattan. you have to have thr
to at least 60,000 homes and businesses in the new york city area. many of them had just got entheir power restored. >> the winter storm brought rain, strong winds and several inches of snow region. airlines cancelled nearly 1600 flights and highways and train routes were also disrupted and families shivered in homes. ben, how is everybody doing? >> reporter: well, norah you can see this is the last thing that people needed. the streets in tuckerton flood again, front yards flood. as nor'easters go this wouldn't be a big deal. but for a couple of days people were able to come back to this neighborhood to save what they could, tearing out carpets, ripping down walls. that has now been put on hold. one woman said this second storm feels like a second punch to the gut. when the nor'easter slammed into the jersey shore wind and rain quickly turned into a whiteout as temperatures plummeted into the low 30s. volunteers handed out blankets for those with no heat. >> just won't end now. unfortunate want it to be over. >> reporter: in snow covered belmar a generate oris running nick's one light and
and businesses in the new york city region many of them had just gotten their power restored. >> the winter storm brought rain, strong winds and several inches of snow to the region. airlines canceled nearly 1,600 flights. highways and train routes were also disrupted and families shivered in homes across the northeast as temperatures fell below freezing. ben tracy is in hard-hit tuckerton, new jersey, along the jersey shore. how are they doing there? >> reporter: charlie and norah, good morning. good morning to our viewers in the west. folks here not doing so well this morning. streets are flood eded here in tuckerton. front yards are flooded. while this nor'easter on its own may not have been that big of a deal, here is the problem. for a couple of days people have been able to come back to neighborhoods like this, to begin the recovery rip out carpets and walls and stay ahead of the mold that is growing in some of these areas. that's all been put on hold. that one woman who told us that the second storm feels like a second punch to the gut. when the nor'easter slammed
this morning in new york city and many other communities. however, drivers are still waiting in those long lines for gasoline. and officials predict another difficult commute this morning because not all subways and trains are running yet. >> there is new you are jens in the recovery effort this morning because the weather is not helping millions of storm victims. jim axelrod is in the hard hit rockaways section of queens. >> reporter: good morning. this week, the weather forecasts are providing one more challenge for those parts of new york and new jersey that have been devastated by sandy. freezing temperatures that will affect the nearly 1.5 million customers still without power. >> onions. >> reporter: in the far rockaways section of queens, volunteers like diane chang aren't waiting for the government to help those who need it. they're doing it themselves. >> we're told they needed hot food out here. we thought we'd cook some hot food. >> reporter: at this intersection a makeshift supermarket sprang up in a parking lot. donations from churches and synagogues provided the inventory. fo
and we've already seen how bad that can be in new york city. we'll have more on that destruction there especially in the breezy point neighborhood coming up at 6:30. >> we were talking -- you can't even get trailers for people to stay in as temporary housing because there's no infrastructure and you've got to clear away all of that debris. >> reporter: yeah and in lower manhattan most of the roads are still completely flooded with water. they have to pump it all out. it's crazy. you can really understand why sandy is now being called new jersey and new york's katrina. >> it's big deal. >> thanks christine. >>> here's a look at the latest outage numbers in our area -- >>> this morning, police continue to investigate a fatal pedestrian accident in jermantown. sky 9 was over the scene yesterday when a 15-year-old was killed on jermantown road at wisteria drive. the victim has been identified as christina morris-ward. she was a tenth grader at seneca valley high school and he was walking to -- she was walking to school. julie wolf excuse me is live on the scene in jermantown and she
in new york city is starting to come back. some subway lines and amtrak are going to run on a schedule. at least there was some public transportation to help them. the congestion eased a bit thanks to a car pool rule. that made a difference. all three major airports were open today for the first time since the storm hit at limited capacity. well, the military used cargo jets to fly power trucks and crews from california to try to help new york clean up sandy. 69 vehicles from southern california were flown in from the west coast. they also sent generators and water pumps to help with clean-ups. the navy will be on stand by in case the state government asks for them help. and now, picking up the pieces from sandy. staten island is a 60 square mile portion of new york city and it suffered some of the worst devastation from the storm. 19 of the city's deaths happened on staten island and today, i toured some of the hardest hit areas and spoke with residents just beginning to pick up the piecing of their shattered lives. this is quincy avenue and you still can't get close to house number 8
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 217 (some duplicates have been removed)